How To Choose A Lounge Chair

The beauty of a lounge chair is that it functions both as a decorative, statement piece, as well a place of solace and retreat within the bustle of home life. We stock a range of contemporary lounge chairs as well as design classics, allowing you to choose a chair that is as much a piece of art as it is a piece of furniture.

A number of historically-designed lounge chairs exhibiting a firm grasp of function have become design classics due to their emphasis on comfort, high performance, and beauty. We stock a selection of classic pieces, carefully curated from the past century of interior design.

Things to Consider

 

To create space in a smaller sized room, keep furniture pieces to a minimum.

 

Larger spaces can benefit from the drama and presence of darker woods and colours. In smaller rooms, lighter coloured upholstery can provide the illusion of more space, as can co-ordinating your furniture.

 

Consider the shape of the lounge chair that will best suit its desired functions. High backs offer privacy in a living room, and excellent support for the head and neck, whereas more horizontally-oriented loungers offer flexibility and more restful lounging. Design-focused pieces will bring added flair when placed at the centre of a room.

Choosing Upholstery

 

With so much variety available, it can be difficult to know how to choose the best fabrics. Ideally, you will want to know whether the tones you are choosing match existing tones in the room, and to see how they match with your other furniture pieces. We have made this easier for you by offering all of our 42 exclusive fabric options as samples, either to view in store, to order online, or to take home.

 

As a general rule for all fabric upholstery, direct sunlight can cause the material to fade and age, so always protect your pieces from sun exposure.

“Chaises-longues can be used to very good effect in the right place.”

 

Sir Terence Conran, The House Book, 1974

Eames Lounger

By Charles and Ray Eames

 

One of the most famous creations of Charles and Ray Eames, this luxury lounge chair was designed in 1956 and has since undergone some key modern upgrades by Vitra to offer larger dimensions and a wider array of covers, shells, and bases. Amply proportioned, made from high-quality materials, and lighter and more modern than conventional club chair armchairs, the Eames Lounger is a modern furniture classic.

Karuselli

by Yrjö Kukkapuro

 

The Karuselli Lounge Chair is a contemporary design classic. Developed in 1964 by Yrjö Kukkapuro, the Karuselli offers a beautiful, snug seat, the result of numerous experiments into how snow moves around you when you sit in it. An impeccably artful addition to the home

“It’s the most comfortable chair in the world… I lie back in it with a glass of whisky and a cigar and immediately feel that life is worth living.” ­

 

Sir Terence Conran on the Karuselli Lounge Chair, The House Book, 1974

Grand Repos

By Antonio Citteri

 

Designed in 2012 by Antonio Citterio and crafted by Vitra, the Grand Repos is the epitome of comfort and relaxation, presented in timeless elegance. The chair adjusts to the sitter’s position and weight thanks to its biomechanics, which can then be locked into any desired position. This iconic piece is finished in grey to allow harmonisation with a variety of interior schemes

Egg Chair

By Arne Jacobsen

 

A strong, sculptural silhouette is the stand-out feature of the Egg Lounge Chair, which comes in a variety of fabric and leather upholstery. Developed by architect Arne Jacobsen’s experimentation with clay forms, the Egg was first produced in 1958. Its shape offers privacy and comfort for reading and relaxing, as well as a striking touch of personality.

LC4 Chaise Longue

by Le Corbusier

 

The LC4, also known as the “relaxing machine”, is one of the simple, tubular designs that Swiss architect Le Corbusier became famous for. Designed in 1928, this lounge chair is the perfect balance of form, function, geometry, and art history.

“To over-furnish is death to flexibility, quite apart from the claustrophobia it induces”

 

Sir Terence Conran, The House Book, 1974